November 22, 2017

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  #11  
Old 03-15-2016, 07:30 PM
jfflyfisher jfflyfisher is offline
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Originally Posted by flyfish_tfo View Post
That was way back, though. I doubt many, if any are still around.
Well...it wont hurt to look and stranger things have happened
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  #12  
Old 03-16-2016, 05:19 PM
David Mueller David Mueller is offline
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they are still around
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  #13  
Old 03-16-2016, 07:00 PM
jfflyfisher jfflyfisher is offline
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they are still around
Thanks Dave, i sent you a PM
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  #14  
Old 03-25-2016, 03:07 PM
Lakeside5 Lakeside5 is offline
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Thought this might be a useful article for you about how the state decided it was a "good" idea to have a sea-run brown trout population instead...

http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/mari...rown-trout.pdf
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  #15  
Old 03-26-2016, 01:46 PM
jfflyfisher jfflyfisher is offline
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Originally Posted by Lakeside5 View Post
Thought this might be a useful article for you about how the state decided it was a "good" idea to have a sea-run brown trout population instead...

http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/mari...rown-trout.pdf
Thaks bud. I've seen that. I'm all for brown trout or rainbow trout in systems where a wild brook trout population is impossible. While 3-400 years ago brook trout swam in EVERY stream they could get into in New England, today, some places are far too degraded and would cost far too much money to fix.

This is why I want to find and protect what little chance of salters we have left. Why not protect/restore them before it will be finacially impossible to do so? There are coastal streams that could easily support sea-run brook trout, and i'm sure there are some that do. Why not protect them before they're gone because of water withdrawals or culverts or stocking?
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  #16  
Old 03-29-2016, 08:07 PM
brooktroutangler brooktroutangler is offline
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I would try to get in touch with Ron Lasko who wrote A Tale of Two Rivers. He is an expert on salters and their respective habitat and conservation. He lives in Osterville, MA on Cape Cod.
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  #17  
Old 03-30-2016, 01:00 PM
jfflyfisher jfflyfisher is offline
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Originally Posted by brooktroutangler View Post
I would try to get in touch with Ron Lasko who wrote A Tale of Two Rivers. He is an expert on salters and their respective habitat and conservation. He lives in Osterville, MA on Cape Cod.
Thank you. I'm sure i'll encounter him sooner or later, his name has come up before in conversation with the executive director of SRBTC.
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