June 19, 2019

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Old 04-06-2019, 11:09 AM
Chris_NH Chris_NH is offline
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Default Exploring remote waters north of the notch... input

Howdy all,
I'm going to be exploring and fishing a lot of the most remote waters, both streams and ponds, from Milan to the top, and wanted input on water temp. What would you look for as a minimum before considering it a waste of time? My goal is to get an accurate feel for how they all fish and what's worth returning to.

Want to get an early start, but not so early as the results are meaningless.

Thanks for any input,
Chris
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Old 04-07-2019, 10:45 AM
Warren Warren is offline
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Default Exploring remote waters north of the notch... input

Some people can start catching trout when the water temp is in the 30's. It just takes a lot of time on the water and experimenting with different techniques.

I'm sure that the ponds are still iced in up there but you can start catching trout in the ponds just after ice out, again the fishing may be slow and would take time on the water to get a good feel of what works.
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Old 04-08-2019, 03:14 PM
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Redneck_Flashaboo Redneck_Flashaboo is offline
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I don't bother heading north till early June, sure you might hook a few but unless your tossing worms its just gonna be a lot of casting practice. Plenty of great action for wild fish to be had in the lakes region in May. And with this years weather you might be looking at july before the snow melts!
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Old 04-10-2019, 09:32 PM
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blindskate blindskate is offline
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When I'm fishing brooks in the Spring I'm looking for 40 degrees for them to start actively feeding. Once we hit 40 it's good to go. For ponds I'm looking for a little warmer. I'm gonna find out what specific temp is this spring. I'm in much better shape to explore water this year. Years past I didn't wanna hike up a mountain and waste my time not catching fish, or worse, finding a pond with ice on it. This year I'm in a much place to explore remote ponds and it's basically all I want to to.
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Old 04-12-2019, 07:54 AM
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Steve H. Steve H. is offline
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Rick Estes is giving a talk on April 24, 7:00 in Concord.

https://nhfishgame.com/2019/04/10/fr...remote-waters/
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It is a plain fact, however, that downstream fishing with a non-imitative fly (lure, in the British sense) does not mix comfortably with upstream imitative fishing...I'll stay out of the argument about whether this technique is really fly fishing. In terms of interest, it is for me ahead of most downstream fishing and spinning. And I've already opined that spinning is better than staying at home with the television set.

Datus Proper, "What The Trout Said"
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Old 04-14-2019, 11:21 AM
Chris_NH Chris_NH is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blindskate View Post
When I'm fishing brooks in the Spring I'm looking for 40 degrees for them to start actively feeding. Once we hit 40 it's good to go. For ponds I'm looking for a little warmer. I'm gonna find out what specific temp is this spring.
Thanks. 40 was what I initially had in mind.

Follow up question... generally how much better is the fishing in same water with temp say in the high 40's or 50 vs when it's 40? Just your ballpark guestimate. 50% more productive, twice as productive?

If you're interested in comparing notes I'll set a reminder to come back here later in spring to compare what we've found with temp.
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Old 04-14-2019, 11:24 AM
Chris_NH Chris_NH is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve H. View Post
Rick Estes is giving a talk on April 24, 7:00 in Concord.

https://nhfishgame.com/2019/04/10/fr...remote-waters/
Interesting. If it wasn't a 3 hour drive I'd likely go.
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Old 04-19-2019, 09:37 AM
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blindskate blindskate is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_NH View Post
Thanks. 40 was what I initially had in mind.

Follow up question... generally how much better is the fishing in same water with temp say in the high 40's or 50 vs when it's 40? Just your ballpark guestimate. 50% more productive, twice as productive?

If you're interested in comparing notes I'll set a reminder to come back here later in spring to compare what we've found with temp.
The closer you get to 58 the better the fishing will be. In certain brooks even 40 won’t turn them on too much. I know a particular stream up by Bethlehem that my buddy and I each caught 90 brookies out of one day, the water was 59.7. I remembered trying that same stream when it was 48 and not seeing s single fish. I believe that night before was very cold, though, so the temp probably dropped 5 degrees real fast and shut them off entirely, something else to be mindful of.
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Old 04-22-2019, 10:53 AM
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Steve H. Steve H. is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blindskate View Post
my buddy and I each caught 90 brookies out of one day
Each?? I think I would have been bored after about 86 or 87.
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It is a plain fact, however, that downstream fishing with a non-imitative fly (lure, in the British sense) does not mix comfortably with upstream imitative fishing...I'll stay out of the argument about whether this technique is really fly fishing. In terms of interest, it is for me ahead of most downstream fishing and spinning. And I've already opined that spinning is better than staying at home with the television set.

Datus Proper, "What The Trout Said"
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Old 04-22-2019, 11:07 AM
ZombieWolfe ZombieWolfe is offline
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Default Water temperature gauges

Quote:
Originally Posted by blindskate View Post
The closer you get to 58 the better the fishing will be. In certain brooks even 40 won’t turn them on too much. I know a particular stream up by Bethlehem that my buddy and I each caught 90 brookies out of one day, the water was 59.7. I remembered trying that same stream when it was 48 and not seeing s single fish. I believe that night before was very cold, though, so the temp probably dropped 5 degrees real fast and shut them off entirely, something else to be mindful of.


Throwing a curve to this thread. What do you guys use for water temp gauges? 59.7 indicates a digital gauge. I've been looking around at various gauges and they all seem to have relatively poor reviews regarding accuracy, hard-to-read scales, slow response and poor construction. They're all under $20 and maybe that's why. Any recommendations based on proven field performance?
Thanks
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