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-   -   Suggestions for the north country? (http://flyfishinginnh.com/vforum/showthread.php?t=11009)

meaton 05-16-2019 03:53 PM

Suggestions for the north country?
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hi all,
We've been striking out on the local rivers mainly using bugs that we brought with us from Colorado. Can't decide if there are no holdover/resident fish and that's why we're striking out, or if we're using the wrong flies.


All I've seen on the water so far are midges and a couple stones, but neither has produced thus far.


I think it was on here in a past thread that everyone agreed the one fly to rule them all was the olive bugger.


With that in mind I tied up this little fella last night.


Any other suggestions? Anything you'd change on the bugger in the pic?


Thanks!


Mike


And, yes, that is the wife in the background tying up some purple pheasant tails!

jap201 05-16-2019 04:53 PM

your bugger looks nice. i also carry orange and partridge soft hackle, royal wulff or royal coachman.

tight lines
Joe

Northeast Brookie 05-16-2019 06:39 PM

Still a tad early depending on how “North” you're talking about.
Mayflies are coming... Hendrickson/Red quill, light Cahill, little green and yellow stones, BWO, caddis (tan)...etc.
Go get Hatch Guide for New England Streams - Thomas Ames Jr. Good stuff.

meaton 05-17-2019 09:34 AM

Thanks fellas!


Besides a PT softhackle we don't/haven't used many softhackles, seems like a pretty go to pattern around here. Swinging down and across with those?



Yeah, getting a local hatch guide is a great idea. We've got some of those covered, BWO, caddis, but basically only ever use a parachute adams for mayflies!


Any specific patterns for the stones? We have tons of foam stonefly dries, any of those worth trying round these parts? Or are you mainly chucking stimulators and smaller bugs?


Thanks again!

Northeast Brookie 05-17-2019 11:55 AM

Yup - foam stones work - but know that in the Northeast, stones aren’t as prolific as they can be out West...however a little green stonefly/yellow sally hatch at dusk in June is pretty cool. Google these two for patterns.
Flip over a few of the large freestones in some of the freestone rivers, for there, you’ll also find large golden stoneflies. Never had luck with the adults, but always did well with the nymphs.
You want something nuts, try to hit the Alderfly hatch (Zebra fly) on the Androscoggin. This will happen (water temp specific) mid to late June.
Don’t be afraid to swing some “old school” wets, for the Northeast is where we got this started! Try a combination of gaudy and imitative (say Royal coachman and hares ear wet combo) - down and across. Sure...use the soft hackles as well - small streams keep the hackle sparse, but for larger rivers, I use three turns of hackle.
Others should chime in shortly. This board starts to pick up more during prime time.
Best ~

ljgurke 05-20-2019 06:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meaton (Post 87571)
but basically only ever use a parachute adams for mayflies!

When the water warms up a bit (mid-June), that is about all you need for a mayfly imitation on the White Mt. thin blue lines - size #14-18, maybe carry a few in purple. Also Elk Hair Caddis - green/olive and tan, also #14-18. One or the other usually works when the brookies are looking up ;) I've also run into the green/yellow Sally hatch as Northeast Brookie notes above.

Gone Fishin' 05-20-2019 10:23 AM

I'm definitely not north, but I've been doing well on the local streams and rivers with streamers.

Tan/brown wooly bugger, olive conehead marabou muddler, and brown owl have all been producing well for me.

Size 10, 12 on the buggers, up to size six on the others.

Chris_NH 05-21-2019 09:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meaton (Post 87564)
We've been striking out on the local rivers mainly using bugs that we brought with us from Colorado. Can't decide if there are no holdover/resident fish and that's why we're striking out, or if we're using the wrong flies.

The water temp is still on the chilly side and no big hatches yet hurts, but the truth is that holdover or wild trout in the majority of NH rivers simply aren't abundant. It'll come alive in many areas after the stocking trucks make their rounds, but fly pattern won't be particularly important. In the meantime go after some of the native fish. Fallfish and smallmouth are fun and abundant enough to target and keep a bend in the rod in the meantime.

Quote:

Originally Posted by meaton (Post 87564)
Any other suggestions? Anything you'd change on the bugger in the pic?

Good looking bugger. Only thing I'd change is downsize the hackle a bit, but the fish aren't going to care either way.

Good luck. :)

meaton 05-21-2019 09:37 AM

Thanks for the info everyone! Lots to think about there and lots to tie!

Dave O 06-26-2019 11:54 AM

More suggestions for the North Coiuntry
 
I am having a similar problem and looking for solutions. I have been fishing a trout pond and catching scads of brookies on dries on the surface and almost all are stocked and somewhat small in the 8" range. The lake in question has been very active, but the large fish are not striking very often. I recently tried a #8 wooly bugger in black with a few irridescent highlights. It was quite exciting to see some truly large brookies cruise up and inspect the fly and then turn away and reject it. I saw three large fish and all rejected it. One looked about 16". I then tried slowly trolling over some nice spots at very slow speeds at different depths and tried various techniques with slow and fast retrieves all to no avail. Nary a tug! I posed the question to a Maine guide and he suggested going smaller. I found a few smaller WBs at Eldredge Fly Shop in black, brown, olive and yellow. The olive one looks just like that nice creation of Mike. I am off on Thursday to try it out. In past years I had great luck trolling deep as the weather warmed up. After the first week of July the topwater was too warm and I stopped fishing to protect the fish. This year I have had poor luck with anything trying to catch the big fellows down deep. Interesting!


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