September 17, 2019

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  #11  
Old 06-12-2019, 03:31 PM
Chris_NH Chris_NH is offline
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Originally Posted by flyfish_tfo View Post
Yes, the proverbial 'U' shape! There are times you want that though, especially when fishing a deer hair dragonfly nymph over the weeds - do that and hold on!
True, that is deadly.

Another deadly method is a sink tip with a short leader to a white headed zoo cougar type streamer that gets taken down by the sink tip, hovers, then starts to float to the top before the next strip. Even in stained water you can see the take when the white disappears.

I've streamer fished numerous times with no more than 3 or 4 feet of 15 pound test as a leader with a sink tip and if a fish wants to eat they don't even see the fly line. I bet you could literally tie it directly to the fly line if you could fit that through the eye of the hook.
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  #12  
Old 06-12-2019, 04:56 PM
kmudgn kmudgn is offline
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Blaming your equipment because you are not catching fish is like a tennis player yelling at his racket for a bad shot
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  #13  
Old 06-12-2019, 08:44 PM
flyfish_tfo flyfish_tfo is offline
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Originally Posted by kmudgn View Post
Blaming your equipment because you are not catching fish is like a tennis player yelling at his racket for a bad shot
Interesting analogy. However I don't think there's any blame going on here, at least the way I read into it, I think there's more of a misunderstanding.
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  #14  
Old 06-12-2019, 10:18 PM
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Northeast Brookie Northeast Brookie is offline
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Kmudgn... just a suggestion... Go re-read my original post and point out to where I - or anyone else that follows - is ďblaming equipment...Ē Please...
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  #15  
Old 06-20-2019, 03:58 AM
bridgeman bridgeman is offline
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Default Full sink lines

As a dedicated still water float tuber I almost always use a density compensating 6IPS full sink fly line. I also use a very short 4í to 6í tapered leader. This allows you to count the fly down to the level of the fish and keeps it there. All sinking fly lines have a inches per second (IPS) rating. Stay away from the slower sink rates. Itís just a waste of time. The density compensated line is weighted differently along the length of the line. This allows the line to sink flat keeping the fly in the catching zone. The short leader does the same.
Lots have been said about long cast not being important. Thatís not true about fishing sinking lines. The longer cast stays down longer and catches more fish. I use 2x tippets for streamers and 4x for midges. I donít think tippet size or short leaders spook fish. Not being far enough from the fish sometimes because of a short cast does.
If you donít have a depth finder on your tube or boat, stay with the floating line. Your fishing blind and lucking into you fish.
I have sink tip lines and almost never use them in ponds. The cast like crap, donít keep the fly down and cast like crap.
I even use full sinks for stripers, along with 350 gr. shooting lines. Thatís a different conversation. Long cast needed for this too.
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Last edited by bridgeman; 06-20-2019 at 04:16 AM.
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  #16  
Old 06-20-2019, 11:24 AM
flyfish_tfo flyfish_tfo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bridgeman View Post
As a dedicated still water float tuber I almost always use a density compensating 6IPS full sink fly line. I also use a very short 4í to 6í tapered leader. This allows you to count the fly down to the level of the fish and keeps it there. All sinking fly lines have a inches per second (IPS) rating. Stay away from the slower sink rates. Itís just a waste of time. The density compensated line is weighted differently along the length of the line. This allows the line to sink flat keeping the fly in the catching zone. The short leader does the same.
Lots have been said about long cast not being important. Thatís not true about fishing sinking lines. The longer cast stays down longer and catches more fish. I use 2x tippets for streamers and 4x for midges. I donít think tippet size or short leaders spook fish. Not being far enough from the fish sometimes because of a short cast does.
If you donít have a depth finder on your tube or boat, stay with the floating line. Your fishing blind and lucking into you fish.
I have sink tip lines and almost never use them in ponds. The cast like crap, donít keep the fly down and cast like crap.
I even use full sinks for stripers, along with 350 gr. shooting lines. Thatís a different conversation. Long cast needed for this too.
Agree with the sinking lines. However I've never had a fish finder on any of my tubes and still consistently get fish while fishing 'blind'.
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  #17  
Old 07-09-2019, 05:06 AM
Troutaholic Troutaholic is offline
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Default Perry Soroko

I sometimes fish with an old timer by the name of Perry Soroko. Some of you may know of him. He fishes sinking line and nothing else. Perry always catches fish. He even uses a sinking line for steel head out in New York. He is very unorthodox in his ways and will leave you in dismay.
Perry lost his drivers license about 6 years ago which had a huge impact on getting out. I told Perry about this thread I had read recently here and he got very excited about sharing his experience on fishing ponds. I asked if I should post his phone number to see if anyone would want to take him out and pick his brain. He said to please post it so someone would take him fishing!
So if you want to do a good deed for an old time dredger. Perry would love to go fishing with you. Perry lives in Goffstown. His number is
Six 0 three six eight two nine six 0 five. He has an old light weight aluminum boat and he will man the oars. When he shows you his flies that he uses it will forever change what you thought you Knew about what a fish is thinking or not when it takes.
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  #18  
Old 07-10-2019, 03:39 PM
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Uptown603 Uptown603 is offline
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I fish 95% of the year with a full sink rio deep 7 line on my 5 wt. I have beyond excellent results, so I don't think fish spooking is a thing. I wish there was more reason to use a floating line, but lets face it....... we don't have too many days when we show up at trout ponds in the southern or central part of the state where the water is boiling with rises. That's fact. One thing that irritates me is when some guy is beating the hell out of the water with his floating line all night, not catching a thing, and we meet at the boat ramp at the end of the night. The conversation goes like this........

The guy " Geez you had a good night.... oh you're using a sinking line" I don't say a thing, but can't help thinking to myself " Yep, and I was the guy catching fish all night, and not little 10" stock trout. I was catching the slot fish or bigger." It's a great method , and I'm a bit unorthodox in what I'll use at times also. I'm not a bugologist , nor will I ever claim to be. I have a dozen flies that normally don't fail me. But honestly.... its not always the fly. You could have the right fly, but the wrong strip/ retrieve. Your count could be off (Meaning cast your line, and count to yourself the sink you want based on sink rate per second of your line).

I mean if you think about it.... when you're dry fly fishing you can see what the fish are eating and doing. When you're dredging the bottom, you have no idea what the hell is going on down there. Just my thoughts on the subject.
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  #19  
Old 07-10-2019, 03:41 PM
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Uptown603 Uptown603 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bridgeman View Post
As a dedicated still water float tuber I almost always use a density compensating 6IPS full sink fly line. I also use a very short 4í to 6í tapered leader. This allows you to count the fly down to the level of the fish and keeps it there. All sinking fly lines have a inches per second (IPS) rating. Stay away from the slower sink rates. Itís just a waste of time. The density compensated line is weighted differently along the length of the line. This allows the line to sink flat keeping the fly in the catching zone. The short leader does the same.
Lots have been said about long cast not being important. Thatís not true about fishing sinking lines. The longer cast stays down longer and catches more fish. I use 2x tippets for streamers and 4x for midges. I donít think tippet size or short leaders spook fish. Not being far enough from the fish sometimes because of a short cast does.
If you donít have a depth finder on your tube or boat, stay with the floating line. Your fishing blind and lucking into you fish.
I have sink tip lines and almost never use them in ponds. The cast like crap, donít keep the fly down and cast like crap.
I even use full sinks for stripers, along with 350 gr. shooting lines. Thatís a different conversation. Long cast needed for this too.
I find most of my hits are when the fly starts up from the "belly" of the sink. Do you find this as well?
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  #20  
Old 07-10-2019, 08:05 PM
flyfish_tfo flyfish_tfo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uptown603 View Post
I fish 95% of the year with a full sink rio deep 7 line on my 5 wt. I have beyond excellent results, so I don't think fish spooking is a thing. I wish there was more reason to use a floating line, but lets face it....... we don't have too many days when we show up at trout ponds in the southern or central part of the state where the water is boiling with rises. That's fact. One thing that irritates me is when some guy is beating the hell out of the water with his floating line all night, not catching a thing, and we meet at the boat ramp at the end of the night. The conversation goes like this........

The guy " Geez you had a good night.... oh you're using a sinking line" I don't say a thing, but can't help thinking to myself " Yep, and I was the guy catching fish all night, and not little 10" stock trout. I was catching the slot fish or bigger." It's a great method , and I'm a bit unorthodox in what I'll use at times also. I'm not a bugologist , nor will I ever claim to be. I have a dozen flies that normally don't fail me. But honestly.... its not always the fly. You could have the right fly, but the wrong strip/ retrieve. Your count could be off (Meaning cast your line, and count to yourself the sink you want based on sink rate per second of your line).

I mean if you think about it.... when you're dry fly fishing you can see what the fish are eating and doing. When you're dredging the bottom, you have no idea what the hell is going on down there. Just my thoughts on the subject.
This is probably the best and most in-depth thread on this site in a while! I like what's going on here! Lots of good information being shared.

I find as well my full, fast sinking lines are my most productive throughout the season. HOWEVER, there are a few ponds in the south central part of the state where you DO NOT want to be without a floating line 'cause when they start popping on midges they won't touch much of anything else.
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