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  #81  
Old 08-05-2014, 11:30 AM
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brookieslayah,

62% is what the study says, not me. Maybe NHF&G knew what they were talking about when asking anglers not to remove fish from the water, if the fisherman planned to release the fish.
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  #82  
Old 08-05-2014, 02:10 PM
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This discussion is getting a little out of hand. I will start by saying that I do not go around bragging about catching 80 fish in a day. I was young, newer to wild trout fishing, and those days are rare. My point was that there are still streams that will allow for 80 fish days and there use to be streams and rivers all over the state which allowed for hundred fish days. My point was that our streams do have the possibility to produce fisheries with thousands of fish a mile. I apologize for upsetting anyone. You should really try to understand the background of ones statement before you cram your words down their throats....

Now, as for the post release mortality, 62%, 28%, etc etc etc. If you read that study there are a few things to take into consideration. #1, In that study they exhausted the trout for 10 MINUTES before taking them out of the water. How often does someone truly fight a rainbow for 10 minutes. I think it has happened maybe 2 times in my entire life. #2, That study is refereeing to rainbow trout only! That piece of literature may not be accurate for browns and brookies as well? #3, The people who should be most aware of that article are steelhead fishermen. Steelhead (which are the same thing as a rainbow trout, genetically) are larger fish which can take much more time to land then a rainbow trout. Fighting a steelhead for 10 minutes is common and taking pictures of your trophy steelhead is also very common. Post release mortality of catch-and-release steelhead is quite high in some fisheries.

So, I have spent the past 4 weeks of my life living 500 ft from the South Fork of the Snake River. I float the river every day, I work at a fly shop here every day, I talk to guides all day long, and I interact with people who fish the river all day long. This is a completely wild fishery with no stocking. It hasn't been stocked in quite some time and its trout population is flourishing. The cutthroat are completely catch and release. When I fish the river, I catch about 80% cutthroat and the rest is rainbows and browns. This fishery has been thriving for a very long time despite the fact that thousands of fish are caught and released each day. So why are there still thousands of trout if people are catching and releasing thousands per day? Well, because proper catch and release practices can and will work to help sustain wild fisheries. My favorite wild trout river in ME is catch and release. It gets fished pretty heavily ( I see people every time I am there) but yet, somehow, there are still thousands of wild brook trout and LLS. And many of these fish are in the 18+" range.... just something to chew on.
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  #83  
Old 08-05-2014, 02:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flyfreak288 View Post
This discussion is getting a little out of hand
Amen, brother, amen.
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  #84  
Old 08-05-2014, 02:52 PM
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Reed,

I for one do appreciate your thoughts. You are correct that it is hypocritical to espouse the values of catch and release but then handle fish incorrectly. Where I think you are misguided is in your insistence that one must go fishing with the goal of keeping a few fish, especially larger fish. I know that If I kept my limit of trout on all of my guided trips I would soon be out of business. Moreover if I kept only larger trout I would lose an even more precious resource.

The last time you went fishing must have been before the current regulation of 5 fish as you said you "would keep six fish in a day." Today even a five fish limit is appalling. If we look at how many fish exist in a given pool, if every angler took their limit we would be fish-less very quickly. While you many not agree with catch and release, barbless angling, it is currently the best way to keep fish in our rivers.
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  #85  
Old 08-05-2014, 04:01 PM
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natefish,

You said:
Quote:
The last time you went fishing must have been before the current regulation of 5 fish as you said you "would keep six fish in a day."
I expected better of you natefish, now you are inventing quotes. That is pretty low. I never said I kept six fish in a day, I said I limit my catch to six fish. see below:
Quote:
I set a daily catch limit for myself. I also set a size slot for keepers; typically, this is large enough - say 16" - that I might take home only one or two. My catch limit is on one river, six fish per day. After six fish I must stop fishing that river or stretch of river.
By setting a high limit for a keeper, I often leave the river without a fish. But I might have killed any of the six fish brought to hand. I still appreciate trout as feral animals and potential food, not as indestructible windup toys.

Catch and release is not a panacea; especially when fishermen don't set rational limits on their catching. You saw the math. Flyfreak with his 80 fish days - which plecain defended - would have killed as many or more trout than someone keeping his limit. flyfreak and other C&R fish hawgs also reduce the viability of the eggs and sperm of the spawners.
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  #86  
Old 08-05-2014, 04:15 PM
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Default Speaking of making up quotes...

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Originally Posted by overmywaders View Post
Flyfreak with his 80 fish days - which plecain defended - would have killed as many or more trout than someone keeping his limit.
Reed,

Where is my quote that defended flyfreak's 80 fish day? I asked what YOU would do in the scenario I presented. I did not defend (or attack) anyone.

You inferred that which I did not imply.

Paul
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  #87  
Old 08-05-2014, 05:08 PM
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Plecain, you're attempting to have a rational discussion with a guy who uses the term "reverse waterboarding" to describe photographing a fish.
http://flyfishinginnh.com/vforum/sho...?t=3806&page=2
http://flyfishinginnh.com/vforum/showthread.php?t=3320

And Reed, I'll take your many subsequent replies as a "NO" to my request for you to attempt to stay on topic.
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  #88  
Old 08-05-2014, 06:06 PM
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out of hand is an understatement. It seems were loaded with a sh-tload of college grads here, tons of education and not a lick of sense. And I don't think I'm the only one that has noticed that since the university invasion most of the old time experienced fisherman have left the site. These people were practicing C&R before most of you were born. Their absence is your loss. And what the hell is -WHY DO THINK THIS, is that what they're teaching in college now
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  #89  
Old 08-05-2014, 08:30 PM
natefish natefish is offline
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Reed,

I see now that you meant " limit myself to catch six fish" not keep six fish. That makes much more sense. I'll still hold that all gamefish are too valuable to keep.
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  #90  
Old 08-05-2014, 08:44 PM
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wetfly,

I am on topic. The topic is wild trout and managing for wild trout. I posit that it is not sound policy for one person to catch eighty wild trout in a day. Do you think that is good management of the fishery? Yes or no?

plecain, do you think catching eighty wild trout in a day is acceptable? You asked for numbers, I gave you mine (six trout, stockers or holdover), what is your number? Thirty, fifty, one hundred?

flyfreak, don't come the raw prawn with me. You casually said eighty trout per day on multiple days and no one demurred except me. The forum members were eloquent in their silence. And, to reinforce it you said:
Quote:
My point was that there are still streams that will allow for 80 fish days and there use to be streams and rivers all over the state which allowed for hundred fish days.
So, you still believe that the fishery "allows" for eighty fish days. And you will take eighty fish since the stream "allows" it.

And the ten minutes of exercise of the trout... consisted of chasing them No hook, no fighting against a weight, just swimming. I imagine the biologists were exhausted before the fish.

Our ten pounds of fish per acre are going to look pretty ratty very quickly.
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